A scarab beetle’s larva and pupa: habitats for mites and other organisms

von wirthstef

The micro-world is complex. Its habitats intertwine themselves, some even are unusual, because they are formed by single animal individuals. An example is a holometabolic insect, here the tropical rose chafer Eudicella colmanti. The larvae of my specimens are covered with deutonymphs of an astigmatid mite (Acaridae, eventually Acarus sp.).

This makes the beetle larva to a habitat for these mites, although the mites in this case don’t feed or reproduce there. They instead are „only“ passengers on their transportation to a new „real“ habitat, where they become adult, feed and reproduce. This strategy to be carried by other organisms from one living place to another is called phoresy.

The situation in my terrarium might be artificial in the sense that mites are putatively not of tropical origin as the beetles (reared in Germany) and thus do not originally „belong“ to the beetle species. The mites might have reached into the terrarium via fruit flies or similar native organisms or via the terraria of the online shop, where they were bought. But the mite deutonymphs show a distinct affinity for adult beetles and their larvae nevertheless, which they attached in great numbers (not the pupa). The microscopic footage of the mite deutonymphs contains activities of their genital openings, located close to the sucker plates on their undersides.

They occasionally open and close and discharge secretions or water. This might be due to osmoregulation and/or in order to prove the adjacent sucking structure with moisture for a more stable hold.

The larva after some months built its pupa chamber, consisting of soil particles and larva secretions. Tese pupa chambers offer on their outer sides obviously enough nutrients for collembolans, which appeared there in greater numbers, especially on an older chambers with its pupa waiting to hatch. Mites of the Gamasida and tiny annelids could also be observed there. The video consists of macro fotage and microscopic footage, all recorded in 4K and rendered in an uncompressed quality.

 

Berlin, December 2017/November 2018, copyrights Stefan F. Wirth