biologe

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Tag: function morphology

Habitat compost: Mite Histiostoma sachsi carries old cuticle and dirt as camouflage

My parents have a compost area in their backyards. I use it as reference habitat for two mite species of the family Histiostomatidae (Astigmata): Since I began my research in 2000, the compost regularly contained Histiostoma feroniarum with its typical male dimorphism. Since summer 2017 another species appears additionally regularly: Histiostoma sachsi. Both species do not appear under the same conditions. While H. feroniarum prefers fresher decaying material, H. sachsi on visibly older decomposed tissue. There mite be even more mites of the Histiostomatidae exist in this complex compost habitat, but under my laboratory conditions, only the two named species were so far successfully reared out of samles always again. Regarding the determination of H. sachsi on a species level, I was more careful in my comments to a former video (June 17), in which I named it Histiostoma cf. sachsi due to doubts about a correct identification. Meanwhile, also due to the morphology of the deutonymph, I determine „my“ compost mite as Histiostoma sachsi Scheucher, 1957. But it is still to emphasize that Scheucher described H. sachsi from cattle dung, not from compost. But generally, both habitats can sometimes share the same inhabitants.

 

Adult females carry their old cuticles and „dirt“ on their backs as tactile comouflage

 

Biologically conspicuous is darkish material, which especially adult females carry on their backs. Unlike males, females posses elongated setae on their backsides. These setae support the holding of material such as old cuticle and soil particles. In slide preparations, this cover usually appears amorphic and contains substrate from the mite’s environment. My video footage indicates that the basis of this cover is a retained old cuticle from the former nymphal instar . That this cannot easily be proven with the light microscope is due to the very soft and fine character of the cuticles in these mites. Remnants might become decomposed by microorganisms after a while.

Compost: the habitat of the mite Histiostoma sachsi Scheucher, 1957 (Acariformes, Astigmata, Histiostomatidae). Copyrights Stefan F. Wirth, please like my video also on youtube, in case you like it.

 

The phoretic dispersal instar, named deutonymph, in mites of the Astigmata controls its body position due to sticky leg endings and suckers on their undersides

 

Deutonymphs of H. sachsi represent one of my resent models to study mite-dispersal behavior. My research focus since a while concerns ultrastructure and function morphology of the deutonympal suckerplates and other structures to attach to insects for dispersal (this dispersal strategy is called phoresie). The anterior front-suckers on the suckerplate of the mite’s underside is extendable and very flexible, not only to find a suitable position on the insect carrier. When falling, the deutonymphs use it to lift their bodies up into a proper position again. Additionally they will try to get hold using „sticky“ lobe-shaped setae on the endings of legs I and II. Both is visible in my footage. The forelegs seem generally to make the first contact, when trying to get on a suitable carrier.

 

Deutonymphs of Histiostoma sachsi take a ride on other mites (Oribatida)

 

The suitable carrier of H. sachsi is unknown to me. Some astigmatid species have even a range of carrier-„hosts“. In my samples, deutonymphs at least attach to other mites, especially to mites of the Oribatida. This is in a very short scene visible in my video too.

 

Copyrights Stefan F. Wirth, Berlin December 2018

A scarab beetle’s larva and pupa: habitats for mites and other organisms

The micro-world is complex. Its habitats intertwine themselves, some even are unusual, because they are formed by single animal individuals. An example is a holometabolic insect, here the tropical rose chafer Eudicella colmanti. The larvae of my specimens are covered with deutonymphs of an astigmatid mite (Acaridae, eventually Acarus sp.).

This makes the beetle larva to a habitat for these mites, although the mites in this case don’t feed or reproduce there. They instead are „only“ passengers on their transportation to a new „real“ habitat, where they become adult, feed and reproduce. This strategy to be carried by other organisms from one living place to another is called phoresy.

The situation in my terrarium might be artificial in the sense that mites are putatively not of tropical origin as the beetles (reared in Germany) and thus do not originally „belong“ to the beetle species. The mites might have reached into the terrarium via fruit flies or similar native organisms or via the terraria of the online shop, where they were bought. But the mite deutonymphs show a distinct affinity for adult beetles and their larvae nevertheless, which they attached in great numbers (not the pupa). The microscopic footage of the mite deutonymphs contains activities of their genital openings, located close to the sucker plates on their undersides.

They occasionally open and close and discharge secretions or water. This might be due to osmoregulation and/or in order to prove the adjacent sucking structure with moisture for a more stable hold.

The larva after some months built its pupa chamber, consisting of soil particles and larva secretions. Tese pupa chambers offer on their outer sides obviously enough nutrients for collembolans, which appeared there in greater numbers, especially on an older chambers with its pupa waiting to hatch. Mites of the Gamasida and tiny annelids could also be observed there. The video consists of macro fotage and microscopic footage, all recorded in 4K and rendered in an uncompressed quality.

 

Berlin, December 2017/November 2018, copyrights Stefan F. Wirth